Betty

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Growing up in a family of 6 kids in the warm southeast corner of Washington state was filled with swimming, water-skiing, scouting and all manner of outdoor play.  Then off I went to Seattle for a degree in physical therapy, and work that followed, until 1979 when I bicycled across the United States ending up in Maine, where I lived for the next 28 years. Seven years ago, following the lead of my then 16-year-old son Toby who had fallen in love with the Northwest during family visits, we moved to Eugene, Oregon. Toby now lives 3 hours away in Bend, Oregon pursuing a career in environmental resource management and immersing himself in white-water rafting, back-country skiing,& bicycling while also building a tiny house. These days we meet at the summit of the Cascade Mountains to hike or backpack together. Such fun!

I have retired from my career as a pediatric physical therapist. These days my time is filled with “peace and justice“ activities and periodic travels. It has been a wonderful experience to travel and volunteer in Latin America - Peru, Ecuador, Guatemala and this coming winter (2018)  in Nicaragua. 

Eugene offers endless opportunities for the things that "fill my cup" -  hiking ,biking, gardening and arts. Thich Nhat Hanh, Vietnamese Buddhist monk is a person who inspires me deeply.  The Education of Little Tree, is a book that makes me both laugh and cry every time I read it.


Will, Lynn, Ben & Miles

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Our family is most often a household of four, though one or two more sometimes flow through, as we support them moving into adulthood. Our four include Will, Lynn (me), and our sons, Ben and Miles. Other consistent members are the dogs, Guinness and Sissy; the cats, Mocha and Pabana; and the three hens. I did most of my growing up in a tight-knit, rural community, where neighbors knew each other well and worked together in many ways for the benefit of the greater community, regardless of their opinions or backgrounds - working on road maintenance, supporting the community school and volunteer fire department, and helping each other with transportation and family care. For me, cohousing offers the benefits of that rural lifestyle in an urban or suburban setting. I teach second grade at a small independent school. I absolutely love teaching, but it does take quite a bit of time away from family. I look forward to living in cohousing where we can support one another in order to create space and time for more connection – as a larger, inter-generational community working and playing together; and as a family unit since not having to prepare meals every night, or be responsible for property maintenance on our own, frees up a little more time to be together. Will is an architect, and a builder whenever possible.  He looks forward to having company playing music in the common house, as well as the possibility of a shared shop for woodworking and other projects. He believes that cohousing makes sense in the current climate for a practical way to house ourselves and to build community. It has been exciting for him to be a part of SquareOne Villages, Emerald Village Eugene, which is designing and building homes for people coming out of homelessness and into home-ownership. The SquareOne model is very similar to cohousing, in that connection is intentionally built in by design, both socially and architecturally. Ben spends most of his time with working, hanging out, or away with friends, contemplating as many young adults do, life after high school. He enjoys games that involve strategic planning, and has a great sense of humor. Miles is juggling high school with his entrepreneurial endeavors that include buying and selling things on eBay, and starting a business related to social media for restaurants. He looks forward to living in cohousing before moving out into the world, and coming back to visit, as part of the community. We all look forward to having our home on this special piece of property, a block from where we have lived since Miles was born.

Our family is most often a household of four, though one or two more sometimes flow through, as we support them moving into adulthood. Our four include Will, Lynn (me), and our sons, Ben and Miles. Other consistent members are the dogs, Guinness and Sissy; the cats, Mocha and Pabana; and the three hens.

I did most of my growing up in a tight-knit, rural community, where neighbors knew each other well and worked together in many ways for the benefit of the greater community, regardless of their opinions or backgrounds - working on road maintenance, supporting the community school and volunteer fire department, and helping each other with transportation and family care. For me, cohousing offers the benefits of that rural lifestyle in an urban or suburban setting.

I teach second grade at a small independent school. I absolutely love teaching, but it does take quite a bit of time away from family. I look forward to living in cohousing where we can support one another in order to create space and time for more connection – as a larger, inter-generational community working and playing together; and as a family unit since not having to prepare meals every night, or be responsible for property maintenance on our own, frees up a little more time to be together.

Will is an architect, and a builder whenever possible.  He looks forward to having company playing music in the common house, as well as the possibility of a shared shop for woodworking and other projects. He believes that cohousing makes sense in the current climate for a practical way to house ourselves and to build community. It has been exciting for him to be a part of SquareOne Villages, Emerald Village Eugene, which is designing and building homes for people coming out of homelessness and into home-ownership. The SquareOne model is very similar to cohousing, in that connection is intentionally built in by design, both socially and architecturally.

Ben spends most of his time with working, hanging out, or away with friends, contemplating as many young adults do, life after high school. He enjoys games that involve strategic planning, and has a great sense of humor. Miles is juggling high school with his entrepreneurial endeavors that include buying and selling things on eBay, and starting a business related to social media for restaurants. He looks forward to living in cohousing before moving out into the world, and coming back to visit, as part of the community. We all look forward to having our home on this special piece of property, a block from where we have lived since Miles was born.


Frannie and Phoebe

We are a family of two: my 4-year-old daughter Phoebe and I (oh yes, and then there is our dog, Maddie).  I returned to Eugene in ’08 to raise Phoebe, after many years away.  I grew up in Eugene and have fond memories of biking all over town on the first bike paths and bridges and of helping sell my father’s wooden wares at the first Saturday Market and Country Fair.  I left Eugene for college out of state and after many adventures on both coasts, I have now settled back in Oregon as a nurse and single parent.   We love living in Eugene for its many bicycling and other outdoor activities. We love music, gardening, dancing, and singing. My college experience at Evergreen in Olympia, WA, gave me my first taste of group living as well as many opportunities for working in groups of all sizes on any number of projects.  Moving east in the early 80’s, I picked apples in Vermont and again lived somewhat communally with fellow pickers, and then began my stint working at summer camps and environmental centers around New England and in North Carolina.  All these experiences gave me the opportunity to live, work, cook, and play with wonderful people. I find that though I love having my own home now, I miss that shared living experience, especially now that Phoebe is in my life, and I see how we both benefit from being around a varied group of people.  The prospect of a co-housing community is exciting to me as it combines this private and shared living experience beautifully.


Pat

I grew up the oldest of three kids in the Midwest (Illinois). My family moved to Eastern Pennsylvania when I was 15 and, since then, I’ve had the good fortune to live in and experience just about every corner of the country. I returned to Illinois for college and here I got married, had a daughter and eventually/thankfully an amicable divorce. My daughter, Bridget, and I moved to Tucson, Arizona, where I completed my degree and lived for the next twenty years. I must say, I still miss the most incredible sunrises/sunsets I have ever seen. Not the 114 degree summers, though! Four years ago, my path brought me back to Eugene (for good!), as I truly love it here. To add to my happiness at being here, my daughter and my 4-year-old grandson, Lucian, have moved to Eugene as well. I recently retired from my career in social services, mostly in administration, and am enjoying being a retired person. I’ve worked in corrections, Medicaid and other health care programs, behavioral health, in child welfare and with seniors and the disabled. My favorite jobs have been those where I’ve been involved in creating new programs, and I’ve been fortunate to have been involved in several start-ups during my career. I’m hoping that this experience will be helpful in getting Oakleigh Meadow off the ground! My interests include Buddhist studies and practice, the arts, the outdoors and spending time with my many wonderful friends. With my new retired life, I’m also finding time for tai chi, NIA (dance exercise) and learning to play the ukulele.


Sharon

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I have a theory that our sense of place takes form during our later childhood years and I had the very good fortune to spend those years exploring the sagebrush country of northern Nevada. I like wide-open spaces, but I also grew up with a strong sense of community. I spent nearly 25 years living in Alabama and enjoyed my life in a small college town as a microbiology professor at Auburn University, but now that I have retired I have moved to Eugene.  I am so happy to have returned home to the West of my youth, bringing with me my four-legged companion, Finnegan.  I grew up on stories of the Oregon Trail and the rich soils of the Willamette Valley, so I am anxious to dig into the soil along the river and work with other OMC’ers to grow a verdant garden and lively community. In addition to gardening I like exploring, cooking, reading and playing with Finn.